Calla Lily Guide
 

Calla Lily Care


Once the calla lilies have started to grow in the garden it is time to start caring for them. The calla lily is a hardy plant with very little needs but there are some soil and nutritional amendments you might want to consider. Remember, just because calla lilies are sometimes considered weeds in their country of origin, it does not mean that callas will automatically love your backyard! However, if you give your calla lilies a little extra time and effort the result will show immediately with lots of beautiful flowers stretching up from the healthy plant.

Calla Lily Care – Watering

The calla lily is originally found in tropical marshlands, which means it is a very thirsty plant that will not tolerate dry periods or neglect from the gardener. Either water the plant regularly, especially during those hot summer days, or plant the calla lily where it can get lots of water without having to be in wet soil. If there is a small pond in your garden it will be perfect to plant calla lilies close to it - just remember that it needs to get to the water, since an artificial pond is not automatically in contact with the earth surrounding it. If this simple request of the calla lily is fulfilled, it will fill your garden, guaranteed.

Calla Lily Care – Nutrition

Pink Calla LilyFor those living in climates where the temperature never drops below the freezing point it might be interesting to have the calla lily bloom all year around. This is highly doable but also takes a bit more work from the gardener. Although the calla lily will benefit from a little boost of nutrition once a year, this once a year feeding will not be enough to enable the calla to bloom all the time, it takes more. With a bi-monthly regular feeding schedule, either through liquid fertilizer in the water or compost in the soil, the calla lily will certainly bloom all year around without suffering stress to the plant. Although it is always wise to keep an eye on your plants to ensure you are not over-feeding. Signs of over-feeding include burnt leaf edges, indicating an excess of nitrogen. The less sun the calla receives, the more nutrients it will require to bloom, so strive to assess the conditions of your garden and monitor appropriately.

Caring for Calla Lilies – New Bulbs

As most other plants with bulbs, also known as rhizomes, it propagates by producing more bulbs. A bulb planted in the garden will eventually spread and, if not stopped, has the potential to take over the entire place. So what one needs to do is to dig up these extra bulbs and throw them away, or replant them, or simply give them away to family and friends. This needs to be done regularly as the calla lily will not magically stop producing offspring so splitting the plant every other year or so will do nicely.

Caring for Calla Lilies – In a Pot

When growing a calla lily in a pot the rules are somewhat different. It still needs lots of water, even more than a free growing kind as much of the water gets lost in the pot, but now it is not very bright, start feeding it nutrition. It will need some nutrition if it turns out that the pot soil is exhausted but otherwise, lay low with the fertilizer. It is also very important that the calla lily gets replanted in new soil every year because otherwise there is a great risk that the plant dies. The soil gets exhausted, new bulbs start taking up space, sickness in the soil and toxic levels of fertilizing by-products are all good reasons not to take that too lightly. Just change the soil once a year and the calla lily will be much happier and healthier.